The beauty of differences

 

power of differencesHubby returned home from running errands and excitedly told me about the new screens that had been installed on the gas pumps—screens that played music and TV shows.

“What a great concept,” he gushed. “Now I don’t have to just stand there anymore.”

Had hubby participated in the University of Virginia time alone study, I know he would have been in the 58% of participants who said being alone with their thoughts was difficult.

5 ways to lead from the head and the heart

 

lead with head and heartI’ve long believed that the options we face in life, love, and leadership aren’t limited to either/or choices. What I see is a bountiful array of both head and heart opportunities.

What do you see?

One area where someone’s either/or or both/and orientation shows up in stark head or heart contrast is in how they work with others—whether it’s at the office, home, in the community—in producing results.

Time to stop believing the worst

unconditional positive regardHis written words were cutting, cold, and cruel.

“It’s obvious she’s trying to pull a fast one. Does she think I’m stupid? Some kind of wimp? Tell her she’s finished writing for us. We don’t work with devious people.”

My crime? Emailing the wrong file. I’d been in a hurry and carelessly attached an article that had been published earlier elsewhere. Negligent? Absolutely. Conniving? No way.

The business case for women getting an MBA

Today’s guest contributor is Frances Kweller, entrepreneur and founder of Kweller Prep, a learning incubator specializing in advanced test preparation in New York City.

 

women getting an MBAIdeas are nothing. Execution is everything. 

While women may have many ideas for starting their own businesses, or for improving an existing business, the problem is that far too few of us can execute those ideas.

To succeed in business requires more than just a brilliant idea, or even the courage to execute the idea. It requires a specific skill set. As obvious as that sounds, too often women do not appreciate the value of an MBA degree.

According to data collected by the Graduate Management Admission Council in 2011, women (23%) are nearly twice as likely as men (13%) to have considered pursuing any kind of master’s program, but men (61%) were much more likely than women (47%) to have considered an MBA. 

5 reasons an MBA is a good bet for women

Investing in your employees’ health

Today’s guest contributor is Marsha Friedman, a 24-year veteran of the public relations industry and the CEO of EMSI P.R., a top public relations firm. Marsha is the author of Celebritize Yourself. You can hear her on her weekly Blog Talk Radio Show, EMSI’s PR Insider or connect with her on Twitter. Her insight on investing in the health and well-being of her employees resonates with me. Coming off a summer of surgeries makes me wish I’d made a similar investment in myself a long time ago!

 

invest in employee healthThe culture at my company has always been health-conscious—maybe because I’ve developed so many natural health-marketing plans over the years.

I’ve found that when you make healthy choices easily available and make them fun, people get interested.

So the “office supplies” in our kitchen include jumbo jars of vitamin C and Echinacea. Activities have included afternoon juicing pick-me-ups and a 10-day “fast” challenge. That was a real bond-building experience of nutritious algae shakes and supplements. 

10.3.14 First Friday Favs

 

powerI’m fascinated with power. Have been since a boss misused his in describing a colleague as a colorful butterfly and me as a soft and round Aunt Polly. I’m a woman on a mission to rehabilitate our views of power. As I’m writing a book about power, the last month was filled with going through past notes and research about it.

May these seven posts pique your interest in positive power!

Feedback, fear and stinky cheese

Barry was speechless, first with shock and then with anger, as he read the email from his boss.

See below. Here’s input from Kevin on how you handled the project team meeting today. Get it fixed. Fast.

Thought you should know my reactions to the productivity project team meeting this morning. Don’t know why but Barry led it. Barry was disorganized and unprepared. His answers to questions from finance totally missed the mark.

coachingKevin was Barry’s peer. They were both managers in the operating division of the company where they worked. They’d joined the company on the same day, went through the same onboarding classes, had attended several leadership development off sites together, and occasionally met for lunch. They weren’t best buddies nor were they total strangers.

Clear the Path

Today’s guest post is from Chris Edmonds, founder and CEO of the Purposeful Culture Group, which he launched after a 15-year career leading and managing teams. Since 1995, he has also served as a senior consultant with the Ken Blanchard Companies. Chris is the author or co-author of six books, including “Leading At A Higher Level” with Ken Blanchard. His latest book, “The Culture Engine: A Framework for Driving Results, Inspiring Your Employees, and Transforming Your Workplace”  is being published by John Wiley & Sons this month.

 

Chris Edmonds

Chris Edmonds

How easy is it for your team members to deliver consistent performance?

How easy is it for them to act as great corporate citizens?

It’s possible that your work environment has hurdles and hindrances that inhibit team members from doing the right things the right way the first time. I would go so far to say that it’s probable that your work environment suffers from some of these hurdles!

Clients report a number of things that get in the way of consistent performance by teams and members.

The most common hurdles include:

7 ways to be a trusted leader

trusted leadersA mere eight percent of the employees surveyed in the 2013 Forum Global Leadership Pulse Survey had a high level of trust for their leaders. 34% say they trust their boss less today than they did before. Five percent said they don’t trust their boss at all.

Gallup’s State of the Global Workforce reported that “a solid foundation of trust can lead to increased productivity, profitability and lower turnover.”

Changing stereotypes: let it begin with me

 

change stereotypesThe question posed to the five-member discussion panel was one of those-simple-but-loaded ones:  “How did you learn to change yourself?”