3 things to do next time

 

what to do next timeEach month without fail over the last several years, I’d volunteered for this group. So seeing a new monthly schedule that didn’t contain my name was a surprise. 

In rapid succession, surprise was replaced with anger (how dare they!), then doubt (don’t they want my help anymore?), followed by reflectiveness (is there a message buried somewhere in here?), and finally, curiosity (what’s going on?).

Years ago depending on where I was in my personal development, I would have gotten stuck somewhere in that chain.

Include Girls in the Boy’s Club

Today’s guest post is from Ritch K. Eich, PhD, a retired U.S. Naval Reserve captain, former chief of public affairs at Blue Shield of CA and Stanford University Medical Center, adjunct professor, management consultant, and author of two books: Real Leaders Don’t Boss and Leadership Requires Extra Innings. Ritch has served on 10 for-profit and non-profit boards of directors and trustees.

 

 

women in the old boy clubWhether it’s Hollywood movie studios and their paucity of female directors, the tech industry and their alarming exodus of frustrated women, or the stifling male fraternity culture that dominates Wall Street, women continue to be marginalized in the business world.

The vast majority of CEOs responding to a McKinsey survey noted that hiring females is essential to “getting the best brains.” Sounds pretty obvious, doesn’t it? Despite increasing awareness of this issue, meaningful change remains agonizingly slow—less than 20 of the Fortune 500 CEOs are women, and on average, women earn just 77 cents for every dollar earned by their male counterparts.  

Do’s and Don’ts for Leadership Development

 

Today’s guest contributor is Ivan Serrano, a business, finance and social media journalist living in Northern California. 

 

leaders go firstThere are many styles of leadership just as there are many situations that require leadership. At one end of the spectrum of leadership there are aggressive, autocratic individuals like George Patton and Margaret Thatcher. On the other end, there are leaders like Mohandas Gandhi and Mother Teresa whose styles are characterized by empathy and empowerment. Most leaders have a style that is somewhere between these two extremes.

5 ways to make workplace conflict less messy

 

embracing conflictConflict is a given in most organizations. In families and relationships, too. We see the world through the unique lens of our needs, interests, and concerns.

Depending on our level of tolerance, that diversity of thought, opinion, and perspective can be a powerful tool for innovation, inclusion, and results.

Or it can be a powerful downward drag on productivity and engagement. Research shows that a manager spends between 24 and 60 percent of his or her time dealing with the effects of conflict.

Fiscal Fairy Tales

Today’s post, “Fiscal Fairy Tales,” is from Frank Sonnenberg, an award-winning author who has written five books and over 300 articles. Frank was recently named one of  “America’s Top 100 Thought Leaders” and nominated as one of “America’s Most Influential Small Business Experts.” Frank has served on several boards and has consulted to some of the largest and most respected companies in the world. Additionally, FrankSonnenbergOnline was named among the “Best 21st Century Leadership Blogs.”

 

Frank Sonnenberg fiscal fairy tales

Once upon a time, there was a brat named Phil T. Rich. He grew up with everything a kid could want. He had every gadget imaginable, a house that rivaled the Disney castle, and parents who gave him free rein to do whatever he wanted.

Unfortunately, his parents were rarely around for him –– they had high-powered jobs, you know. And when they weren’t working “killer hours,” they were off to the club to play golf and trade gossip with friends.

Ready for a serving of fabulocity?

strong because of my weaknessesLike a spreading case of the measles, the eight women seated together at the conference shared an inventory of what was wrong with them. I’m bad at pushing back. I can’t say no. I cry at work. I’m a bad public speaker. I’m not confident. I have anger management issues.

The flood of self-disclosures came in response to the request to introduce yourself to your table mates and share something about yourself.

Got some self-awareness?

 

power of leadership self-awarenessA recruiter friend shared an instructive story about the power of self-awareness and how it plays into our leadership abilities. 

A candidate called the recruiter and asked to change the location of their interview. She wanted to meet downtown at the library. She said she had a business meeting earlier in the morning and that this location would be more convenient since it was only a few blocks away.

The recruiter agreed to the new location. She adjusted her schedule because the new location meant she had to add an hour to her commute time.

It’s the day of the interview.

4 Rules for Hiring the Best Employees

Today’s guest contributor is Ed Basler, longtime entrepreneur, CEO of E.J. Basler Co. (provider of precision-machined parts), motivational speaker, author, and president of Fresh Eyes Coaching, a firm helping small businesses in identifying profit opportunities and obstacles. Ed and his wife, Cathi, founded and ran a nonprofit youth organization for 15 years.

 

best employeesExorbitant student loans constitute just one reason why young people eager to experience the world may want to reconsider going to college. There is now $1.2 trillion worth of college debt in the United States, and the average borrower will graduate owing $26,600 according to The Institute for College Access and Success (TICAS) Project on Student Debt.

Having a degree doesn’t guarantee getting a job or even being job-ready. I’m the son of a businessperson, and after four weeks of business school, I realized that the professor had no real-life experience in running a business. I wasn’t going to learn from him the practical principles necessary to succeed.

10 Strategic Career Actions for Women

circle of controlSome things merit a “revisit” and Allard de Jong’s counsel for women in his earlier LeadBIG post is one of them.

Allard describes himself as a coach, trainer and “buffoon” professional. He warns prospective clients that they are about to “enter into a relationship that favors the challenge and loving confrontation.”

Here are his ten tips for women on how to speed up their journey to positions of more power and influence and surviving “in the wacky new world of work.”

Do you have a favorite?

Will you join in to change a stereotype?

dare to change stereotypesI was raised to be kind.

Kindness is a value I cherish and thank my parents for instilling in me. It’s so good to see someone blossom when treated with kindness. And I love it when people are kind to me.

It was major hard to hang on to that orientation in corporate America.